Society - East Africa - Djibouti - International - Conflicts - Humanitarian
Djibouti a death trap as conflicts and drought threaten population
According to the official UN report on Djibouti, food supply and emergency aids is would be needed to keep the larger part of the population alive as drought and rising food prices hit the country hard, an early warning information check has hinted.

According to the official UN report on Djibouti, food supply and emergency aids is would be needed to keep the larger part of the population alive as drought and rising food prices hit the country hard, an early warning information check has hinted.

Djibouti is classified by the UN as both a least developed and a low-income, food and water-deficit country.

An almost entirely desert state that experiences frequent droughts and imports all its staple foods. It has been four consecutive years of minimal rains and both rural and urban populations have been left dependent on food imports due to poor pastoral and agro-pastoral production while international commodity prices have risen steadily.

The most helpless Djiboutians are in the northwest and southeast, where households depend heavily on livestock for food and income, according to the agency.

It is said that the crises have been worsened by high fuel prices, high inflation, decreased remittances, border conflict with Eritrea, and a lack of sufficient government and donor resources to assist affected populations.

At least 340,000 of the country’s 632,000 people are at risk, the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS Net), which is funded by the US Agency for International Development, said in a September 12 report.


Djibouti

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