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Libya: France gets ready to intervene militarily
The propensity for a military intervention in Libya is at its highest, and while the motive is simply to stop Libyans’ legitimate aspiration for a better form of government and way of life from being snuffed out by tanks and planes, the outcome remains uncertain and history would, as always, be the best judge of events between the Gaddafis, Libyans, and the international community.

The international community agreed to a no-fly zone in Libya to prevent Gaddafi airstrikes against his own people. The talk of military intervention forced Gaddafi’s government to agree to a ceasefire. However, there have been reports of continuous attacks on civilians and freedom fighters.

On Friday residents told reporters that they had faced heavy bombardment, with at least 38 people reported dead after an assault by Gaddafi’s forces.

"Gaddafi’s forces are bombarding the city with artillery shells and tanks. They are even bombarding ambulances. I saw one little girl with half of her head blown off," Dr Khaled Abou Selha told Reuters.

Protesters also confirmed that Gaddafi’s acceptance of a ceasefire was a fraud.

"He is lying. His troops are advancing. We don’t believe what Gaddafi says. When he comes to Benghazi he will be fighting. There is no negotiating with Gaddafi," a rebel fighter Mohammed Ishmael al-Tajouri told reporters.

Reports of continuous civilian attacks have increased the propensity for a military intervention. French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe has announced that everything was ready to launch military strikes in Libya.

France and Britain have been leading a drive for military intervention on Libya.

"Tomorrow [Saturday] we will have a summit in Paris with all the major participants in the operations and in the diplomatic effort. So I think it would be a good moment to send the last signal," the French ambassador to the United Nations told BBC’s Newsnight.

Experts believe a military intervention will be difficult and unpredictable, but it is surely better than watching in real time as Gaddafi continues to oppress his people and deny them their right to demand a better form of government.

Gaddafi believes the international community has no justification to interfere in his country saying there will be serious consequences on the Mediterranean and on Europe, if there is any military intervention. But history will be the best judge.


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