Religion, Science and History - East Africa - Tanzania - Religion
Christianity: a papyrus identified as from the 4th century revived the debate on the marriage of Christ
A papyrus dated by scientists as belonging to the 4th century revived the debate on the marital status of Christ

One sentence, written in very old Coptic language could challenge a dogma as old as the world. "And Jesus told them my wife." This small text translated by Professor Karen King, a professor at Harvard Divinity School in Cambridge brings back the debate on the "celibacy of Jesus Christ." According to the information provided by the BBC, this papyrus fragment discovered in either Egypt or Syria was given to the researcher by a private collector in order to be interpretated.

Controversy in which the Church prepares to answer.

In an interview published by the Information Site figaro.fr "According to Father Michel Gueguen, professor of Holy Scripture at the College of Bernardine three points raise up questions or problem: what proves that the "Jesus" mentioned in this fragment refers to Jesus of the Bible? "Jesus was a common name at the beginning of our era, says he, the Old and New Testament have also several. This fragment can refer to a person other than Jesus Christ. "And add" "As we see in the Bible, religious language is symbolic and should not be taken on literally language . God is sometimes referred to as the Bridegroom who comes into covenant with Israel. The Old Testament contains no possessive like the one mentioned in the fragment. Christ never said "my wife" but "woman." Reports the website. In 2003, a novel called "Davinci code" which dealt with the lineage of Jesus Christ and Mary Magdalene provoked debates within the Christian religion. Many religious leaders were on the frontlines to bring the evidence to the contrary. The document yet to be authenticated. His analysis wil be published in the Harvard Theological Review in January 2013.


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